01/23/18

A Reflection for Women of Color

I feel like Advent reflections are supposed to be sweet, something you could read aloud with The First Noel playing the background. But this week, I just want to yell! I want to sit down with every young woman of color that I’ve ever met and tell her, “Please don’t believe the BS that they have been feeding you at church!” Please don’t feel like they are doing you a favor when they patronizingly say, “Women can be good leaders too.”

Maybe even more toxic than the things they say explicitly, are all the things they say to your soul implicitly. Two weeks ago I preached on Luke 1 to a group of leaders, and the implicit audience was women of color: our lived experience, our theological tensions, our worldview was centered. However, the room was a mix of men and women, white people and people of color. Afterwards I ran into one of the WOC in the restroom and I asked how she was doing.

She said, “I don’t know what I’m feeling?…What is happening? …This is strange…I can’t figure out what I’m feeling.”

As we talked, we put together that this was the first time that she, as a woman of color, had been the implicit audience of a sermon. Decades of listening to sermons, and the implicit audience had always been someone other than her.

Every sermon has an implicit audience- it assumes a certain gender, race, and class experience, typically the same as the pastor. Since so many of us attend churches where the pastors are white men, or at least men, the implicit audience is almost always- not us. Sermons are framed around their lived experience, their point of view, their theological narrative.

That does something to our souls.

When the implicit audience of every sermon is male, it devalues us.

When white femininity is used to make us feel less acceptable, less beautiful, less a woman in God’s image, it silences us.

When every Bible commentary we’ve ever seen is written by a man, it dehumanizes us.

And when we turn to our ethnic communities, we often find cultural comfort, but deeply ingrained patriarchy. I want to gather every woman of color together and scream, “Don’t believe them when they say that you are less Asian, less Latina, less black if you question the patriarchy in your community!”

Don’t listen!

Don’t listen to that crap theology that says that our concern for our bodies, and souls, and children are political, but not spiritual. When the concerns for our survival are framed as an earthly concern, but the theological debates of white men are framed as lofty and important. Don’t listen to them.

Listen to Mary.

When the announcement of the new kingdom was made, the first person to explain it to us, and exegete the truth to us, was Mary. Mary interpreted her experience of God, and understood that it had significance beyond her personal story.

His mercy is for those who fear him
   from generation to generation.
He has shown strength with his arm;
   he has scattered the proud in the thoughts of their hearts.
He has brought down the powerful from their thrones,
   and lifted up the lowly;
he has filled the hungry with good things,
   and sent the rich away empty.

In our churches, we are treated like theology by women is cute and secondary, or that it is dangerous because it is feminist. But the theology of the church in the United States has always been the theology of white male liberation. The theology of the church in the United States has always been a cancerous and twisted theology meant to justify the dehumanization of indigenous bodies and the genocide of Native people. When the government said, “Lets destroy the Indian to save the man,” cthurches stepped up and said, “Let us lead the way.” Denominations in the Unites States used the slave labor of Native children to their financial benefit. And they used their white male liberation theology to do justify it.

White male liberation theology is a theology that justified enslaving and torturing Africans, ripping mothers and fathers away from their children for generations and framing it as a kindness. It is a theology that didn’t want to talk about Jesus with slaves if it would make them think about freedom or threatened the economic system.

Founders of Black Lives Matter- Alicia Garza,  Opal Tometi, and Patrisse Cullors

It is a theology that says that queer black women activists are a threat to this country and pedophile old white men should be its senators. This is a theology that has told us to revere the teachers of our own oppression. It has taught white people to be so blind to a systemic understanding of injustice that you can put them in front of a thousand trees, and they will be unable to see a forest. A million dead Native Americans, thousands of dead Black people- is nothing but a series of unconnected events. Their theology teaches them to see the world this way.

Don’t believe them little sister. Don’t believe them.

Listen to Mary.

He has brought down the powerful from their thrones,
   and lifted up the lowly;
he has filled the hungry with good things,
   and sent the rich away empty.

White male liberation theology legislates the liberty of white male bodies under all circumstances- there is no crime that they can commit on Wall Street that will put them in jail, but if you are black and you sold an ounce of weed, you should be in jail for life. If your white male body rapes an unconscious girl, you will get a few months of jail time. If your Native body fights for your land and water, you will be brutally attacked by the police.

Don’t believe them little sister. Don’t believe them.

Madonna of the North Inuit mother and child by H.G. Kaiser

Listen to Mary.

“God has scattered those who are proud in their inmost thoughts.

He has brought down the rulers from their thrones but has lifted up the humble.

He has filled up the hungry with good things, but has sent the rich away empty.”

When the kingdom of God centers the margins, it isn’t token, it isn’t charity. Zechariah is silenced, and Mary moves to the center and articulates the nature of this new kingdom. She exegetes her lived experience, her personal encounter with God, and what is happening to her body. This new kingdom flips everything upside down.  Those in power, those who are rich, those who are powerful- their time is over.

And in celebrating that it is Mary, a poor, illiterate, uneducated young woman who moves to the center and gives us the framing theology for the book of Luke, we must see her for the thinker and leader than she is.

Jose y Maria by Everett Patterson

But we don’t’ need to make her more than human. She doesn’t need to become a virgin for life or someone who never sinned. She does not have to be domesticated and docile, and perpetually letting one boob hang out in every portrait. She does not need to be sinless perfection. And she does not need to be minimized into just a vessel that carried Jesus.

The world does not know what to do with an actual woman who gives us theology AND raises a child.

Who partnered with God AND had sex.

Who understood that God is about lifting up the humble, and marginalized, and hungry and powerless, AND is sending the rich AWAY!

Even today. We make caricatures of women.

It is good to acknowledge that black women were the game changers in the Alabama election. But if we thank them because they saved “us,”but didn’t show up when they called us to say the names of

Sandra Bland

Rekiya Boyd

Sandra Bland

Charleena Lyles

Then we return to tired tropes of making black women’s labor all about helping white people. When we only want to exploit the narrative of their strength, we dehumanize them.

When Asian American women have almost no representation in the media, but an unbelievable amount of representation in porn, it shows that we are not seen as three dimensional human beings that exist outside of the male imagination.

When people have seen more photos of white women in Native headdresses than actual Native American women who are alive today doing important work on the ground, we continue the narrative of colonialism that all the Native people are gone. They are not.

Black women exist in the public consciousness, but to rescue white people.

Native women lead the way at DAPL protest

Native women are erased from public consciousness, but serve as costumes for others.

Asian American women exist for sexual pleasure.

Latina women exist as maids.

Don’t listen to these tiny petty narratives of who we are.

Listen to Mary.

Mary elevates us by being a model of faith, being a theologian, being countercultural. But she doesn’t elevate womanhood to something mythical and unattainable. And she will not be diminished and made trivial and small. She is enough, within the limits of her own skin. And it is with her I stand and await the birth of the Jesus, as they ushers in a new kingdom.

“Our Lady Mother of Ferguson”by Mark Dukes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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